Training Disaster Medicine Trainers (TdmT) - for Community Resiliance

                                                              

Training Disaster Medicine Trainers (TdmT) - for Community Resiliance

Children & Youth International
Solution proposed by: 
International Federation for Medical Student´s Associations (IFMSA) and CRIMEDIM
In a Nutshell: 
Through the use of hybrid teaching methods, TdmT equips medical students from all regions with advanced knowledge in the field of disaster medicine and provides them with skills and methodology to deliver peer to peer disaster medicine basic course within their communities. This results in medical professionals worldwide with enhanced preparedness to respond to the growing numbers of hazards and thereby active contribution to urban resilience.
Where and When: 
Egypt (Cairo): February 2014 Tunisia (Hammamet): March 2014 Poland (Warsaw): April 2014 Taiwan (Taipei): August 2014 Kazakhstan (Astana): August 2014 Turkey (Istanbul): February 2015 Japan 2015 (Sendai): March 2015 Italy (Novara): August 2015 Malta (Malta): March 2016
Challenges: 
The number of disasters has increased and medical physicians need to manage the health care response. A number of studies point to the lack of training in the medical management of disaster response although many governments agree that disaster medicine should be included in the standard medical curriculum. The importance of enhancing education and training in disaster medicine has been perceived by medical students. However, only a small percentage of medical schools have included disaster medicine education in their curriculum. The TdmT provide extracurriculum training and scientific data on the benefits of undergraduate disaster medicine education.
Innovation: 
Disaster medicine is a subject that is mainly taught from experts to experts. The TdmT bridge the gap between experts and medical students. The program equip a selected number of students with expert training in disaster medicine, using innovative methodologies of online disaster simulations. The students are also equipped with skills of peer-to-peer training and examined by experienced disaster medicine trainers. After graduation the TdmT students deliver peer-to-peer disaster medicine trainings in their communities, using the same innovative training methods. This provides long term and wide effect in building urban resilience.
Concept: 
Worldwide there is an increasing demand from students, scientific centers and governments to implement disaster medicine into the medical curricula as an action of health care disaster preparedness and thereby ensure more resilient cities. But experts on disaster medicine are often not well connected to the university system. TdmT brings together medical students and disaster medicine experts from all regions and provides a platform of knowledge exchange and give the students the unique opportunity to gain a deeper view into disaster medicine in all the different aspects. Graduating TdmT students will be multiplicators and bring the concept and the knowledge of disaster medicine into their communities worldwide. Peer-to-peer education has been proven to be an effective method to convey specific knowledge.This methodology also deepen the knowledge, understanding and engagement of the gives training students the opportunity to deepen their expertise through delivering global TdmT students.
Description: 
The TdmT course is delivered by experts to undergraduate students and consist of three parts: Residential course (1) Distance learning (2); Distance planning of the Disaster Medicine Basic Course (3). This ensure possibility for medical students to maintain the master of medicine in parallel to this expert training. The methodology used is centralised around innovative online training methodologies as well as real size disaster simulations. TdmT Residential Course provides advanced knowledge in the field of Disaster Medicine to the students and trains the participants how to create and deliver basic courses using innovative teaching methods such as e-learning and simulations. In details, how to organize and effectively present the topics just learned, how to build and manage different simulation scenarios (paper-based exercises, table-top simulations and computerized simulations), and how to use and organize the CRIMEDIM e-learning platform. Through a networked collaborative learning (NCL) approach, based on the integration of individual study (student-content interaction) and collaborative group learning (student-student interaction), participants will improve and deepen their knowledge learning together by investigating, analyzing, collaborating, sharing, and reflecting, within the Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment (MOODLE) educational software. During the last phase of TdmT course, participants will use their acquired knowledge to design and develop the Disaster Medicine Basic Course, that will be administered to medical students in their different communities.
Impacts: 
Nine Basic Courses have been delivered and one TdmT. Within the middle of middle of 2016 next TdmT will begin. The level of knowledge and understanding have enhanced. The first course was completed in September 2015, with 10 participants from 4 different regions, chosen among over 150 applicants. Mean pre- and post-test results were 5.95±1.29 and 7.29±1.76 out of 10, respectively, with a statistically significant improvement (p<0.05). Most students (90%) were very satisfied with both the topics and the course format.

Photo Gallery

photo Credits: International Federation for Medical Student´s Associations (IFMSA)
photo Credits: International Federation for Medical Student´s Associations (IFMSA)
photo Credits: International Federation for Medical Student´s Associations (IFMSA)