Public Markets In Nepal

                                                              

Public Markets In Nepal

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Solution proposed by: 
Resource Centre for Primary Health Care
In a Nutshell: 
Our efforts are to advocate for the public markets in the city. Public markets should be considered as an integral part of any city planning as they not only increase accessibility to healthy food but also serves as a community place for people to socialize.
Where and When: 
A mapping study was conducted in the year 2015
Challenges: 
The world is undergoing the largest wave of urban growth in history. Cities in Nepal are no exception specially the capital city, Kathmandu. With urbanization the city design, life style and food choices of people are also changing. Before, people were more healthy diet whereas now opt for junk food. Even the local vegetable markets are limited in core areas of cities as new town planning are more into supermarkets and city centers which decreases easy access to healthy food. On top of that there is no government department completely responsible to preserve, protect and manage our markets as per our preliminary information.
Innovation: 
We have first started with study that mapped the public markets in Kathmandu Metropolitan City, and also developed policy recommendations. We believe, protection and preservation of public markets is an effective way to address a key urban health issue. Also because no other organization has yet looked or work towards this issue as urban solution in Kathmandu Metropolitan City.
Concept: 
Non Communicable Diseases (NDC)cause 63% of death globally and more than 50 % in Nepal. The health of people is greatly affected by the state of the cities. The emerging issue of people switching from healthy food like fruits and vegetable to processed foods high in sugar salt and calories are also adding to NCDs. A key to reduce risk of NDCs is for people to consume healthy diets, and for this purpose accessibility and affordability of healthy food should increase. In order to begin addresses issue of healthy eating in the city, we needed to have a better understanding of the food environment.
Description: 
As a first step , we mapped the public markets in Kathmandu. Three types of public market(focused in vegetable markets) were found in the city. The first one have fixed locations and include many vendors under one roof. Vendors are required to pay rental fees for the area they occupy. These markets are owned and managed by Kathmandu Metropolitan City and Ward offices and are termed as permanent food markets and are open for whole day. The second one termed as semi permanent markets have no specified area or permanent structure. They typically occupy parts of rights-of-way or spaces adjacent to temples. Most vendors are not required to pay rent. Semi-permanent markets are generally open in either the morning or evening. The third one identifies were the mobile vendor roaming all around the city with a two or four wheeler with their vegetable and fruits. We located and mapped 15 permanent markets, 39 semi-permanent markets, and 124 mobile vendors in Kathmandu Metropolitan City The central implication of our research is twofold. First, mobile vendors play a central role in the accessibility of fresh produce to people. This is both the case of housebound individuals who take advantage of mobile vendors that make circuits, as well as those who make short trips to reach mobile vendors with fixed locations. Secondly, permanent markets, while paramount to the availability of food in Kathmandu, appear not to be a priority to local authorities, both in terms of preservation and network expansion. If the experience of other rapidly expanding Asian cities offers insight into that of Kathmandu, then both components of the retail food environment mentioned above—permanent markets and mobile vendors— may come under threat from a policy perspective.
Impacts: 
This is first attempt to understand the food environment in the city. During the study, an interaction with the vendors also took place where the seemed worried about their present existence and effort to survive. The vendors were looking forward to work together to promote and protect the public markets as it also opens business opportunity to small local vendors as it serves as a public space for people.

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