Transforming Neighbourhoods and Livelihoods

                                                              

Transforming Neighbourhoods and Livelihoods

Today around the world, a quarter of the urban population lives in slums[1]. In developing countries 881 million urban residents live in slum conditions. In 1990, this figure was 689 million. This represents an increase of 28 per cent in slum dwellers’ absolute numbers over the past 15 years, even though the proportion of the urban population in developing countries living in slums has declined from 39 per cent to 30 per cent during the same period[2]. Each day slum residents are forced to fight for a better quality of life. If humankind succeeds in understanding their challenges, we will be able to come up with the sustainable solutions that will realize their full potential and help build better and more prosperous cities for all.

The living conditions of the people living in slums must be improved and slum proliferation halted. National and local authorities should see these as priority urban tasks for them to address and dedicate efforts not only in pursuit of enforcing the poor citizens’ rights but also to facilitate their economic and social progress and, as a result, boost the overall prosperity of cities and towns. Reducing inequalities in the urban context by integrating the people living in slums into the broader urban fabric makes more prosperous and sustainable cities[3]. A process in which the knowledge and contribution of the concerned communities are important elements of the solution in order to enable the billion slum dwellers to transform their own lives.

Slum upgrading initiatives can have a positive effect in the slum residents’ livelihood if they are people centered  and participatory. PSUP supports community-led service provision and community contracting as a way to boost entrepreneurship. Improving the living conditions of slum dwellers increases their prosperity, individually and collectively.

 


[1] UN-Habitat (2015), World Cities Report 2016
[2] United Nations (2015), The Millennium Development Goals Report, UN-Habitat (2015), World Cities Report 2016
[3] UN-Habitat (2015), Construction of More Equitable Cities