Recognising the People Living in Slums

                                                              

Recognising the People Living in Slums

In our world, one in eight people live in slums, averaging one billion people living in slum conditions today[1]. This not only amounts to a rather unacceptable contemporary reality but to one whose numbers are continuously swelling. In spite of great progress in improving slums and preventing their formation, which is represented by a decrease from 39 per cent to 30 per cent of the urban population currently living in slums, the population in developing countries still continues to grow[2] and the slum challenge remains a critical factor for the persistence of poverty in the world, whilst excluding fellow citizens from the benefits of urbanization as well as access to fair and equal opportunities, in order to attain individual and collective progress and prosperity.

Recognition of the slum challenges involves acknowledging the need of enforcing the rights and realizing the potential of slum dwellers must be a priority. Urban authorities need to address the challenges of people living in slums and pursue an improved urban governance to create more prosperous and sustainable urban contexts. Such as devising the affordable housing mechanisms that fulfill the right to adequate housing for all income levels and putting housing at the centre. Strengthening of a policy response, a dedicated policy framework to regulate sustainable urban development and the upgrading and prevention of slums is a precondition for effective, sustainable, long term and large scale responses. Such institutionalized frameworks should address issues concerning land, housing and infrastructure, finance, mobilization of local resources, construction standards and other related areas (e.g. labour, health and education).

Robust policy addressing the needs of society’s vulnerable groups is a precondition for sustainable development. PSUP advocates for the integration of slum matters into all levels of policy frameworks. Slum upgrading should be based on global principles addressing local needs. These factors are what influences PSUP when adapting their approaches, also in accordance with the formation of PSUP country teams.

 


[1] 881,0880, 000 slum dwellers are estimated to be living in developing countries, only, and this figure has been calculated considering just four out of the five slum houshold’s deprivations included in UN_Habitat’s definition, as security of tenure can’t be accurately calculated yet. In some countries with limited information, only one of the five components has been measured. Thus, the 881 million can indeed be considered a global minimum.
[2] United Nations (2015), The Millenium Development Goals Report, UN-Habitat (2015), World Cities Report, 2016.