Hammarby Sjöstad is Stockholm’s biggest urban development project for many years.

                                                              

Hammarby Sjöstad is Stockholm’s biggest urban development project for many years.

FIDIC
Solution proposed by: 
The City of Stockholm together with many developers, entrepreneurs, planners, architects, consulting engineers, environmental specialist, the public and several more
In a Nutshell: 
Sweden is well positioned regarding sustainable urban planning, development and construction with strong tradition of co-operation between planning authorities, architects, consulting engineers, and developers. Hammarby Sjöstad is about: visions for sustainable oriented urban design and architecture a coordinating organization for planning, development and implementation an integrated planning a strong environmental program
Where and When: 
Hammarby Sjöstad, Stockholm. Implementation from 1997 and still under development
Challenges: 
Hammarby Sjöstad is a natural continuation of Stockholm’s inner city has helped shape the infrastructure, planning and design of the buildings. Right from the start, the city has imposed strict environmental requirements on buildings, technical installations and the traffic environment. Once fully built, Hammarby Sjöstad will have more than 11 000 residential units for just over 25,000 people and a total of about 35,000 people will live and work in the area. The idea is to expanding the inner city with a focus on sustainable urban development, while converting an old industrial and harbour area into a modern neighbourhood
Innovation: 
Integrated planning with an eco-focus. The goal was and still is to create a residential environment based on sustainable resource usage, where energy consumption and waste production are minimised, and resource saving and recycling are simultaneously maximised. Hammarby Sjöstad is home to exciting new technical solutions for energy supply and energy use, sewage treatment and waste disposal system. One tried and tested example of integration solutions comes in the form of the heat extracted from the treated wastewater, which is used to produce district heating and, from the left-over product of this process, district cooling
Concept: 
Hammarby Sjöstad is Stockholm’s biggest urban development project for many years. Sjöstaden is a natural continuation of Stockholm’s inner city, and this has shaped the infrastructure, urban planning and design of the buildings. The water has inspired the name of the entire project – the town around the lake, Hammarby Sjö. This expansion has involved extensive reconstruction of the infrastructure, with traffic barriers removed and the old industrial and terminal areas phased out, concentrated or given a new purpose. Once fully built, Hammarby Sjöstad will have more than 11 000 residential units for just over 25,000 people and a total of about 35,000 people will live and work in the area. Hammarby Sjöstad adds a modern, semi-open, block-based city, forming a combination of a closed, traditional inner city with more modernistic and open planning. The inner city street dimensions, block sizes, building heights, density and functionality mix are integrated with a new openness, waterfront views, parks and sunlight. The limited building depths, recessed penthouse flats, maisonettes, large balconies and terraces, and not least the big windows, flat roofs and light-coloured rendering on water-facing facades, all embody applications of a modernistic architectural programme.
Description: 
The City of Stockholm has imposed stringent environmental requirements on buildings, technical installations and the traffic environment. The planning process and resulted in new and integrated environmental solutions as: - environmental consideration is the key for all of the materials used. Eco-inspections for all who builds in Hammarby Sjöstad, who must check and declare their chemical products and construction materials before their project begins, and eco-inspections are conducted regularly. a combined heat and power plant uses heat pumps, sea water and treated domestic waste as an energy source to produce district heating and electricity. - wastewater, after been cooled down by the heat pumps when generating district heating, is used to cool the water that circulates in the city district cooling network. - biogas is extracted from the digestion of sewage sludge from the wastewater treatment plant. and primarily used as vehicle fuel in buses and cars but also in approximately 1,000 gas stoves. - eco-friendly waste is recycled: newspapers, glass, cardboard, metals, etc. - combustible waste is converted into district heating and electricity. - soil decontamination work has been carried out to avoid harming either the environment or people’s health. In addition to buses and a light rail link, which runs centrally along Sjöstaden’s esplanade and has four stops in the district, there is also a ferry link across Hammarby Sjö. Residents also have access to a car pool in the area. The design scheme can be characterised as social oriented with modern, semi-open, block-based city, a combination of a closed, traditional inner city with more modernistic and open planning. The eco-friendly adaptation of Hammarby Sjöstad project also involves a major investment in green spaces, walkways, several large parks, a reed park with wooden jetties, etc. There is also a wide range of commercial services.
Impacts: 
Hammarby Sjöstad is Stockholm’s biggest urban development project for many years, is a natural continuation of Stockholm’s inner city, and has shaped sustainable infrastructure, urban planning and design of the buildings. A strong Swedish tradition of co-operation between planning authorities, architects, consulting engineers, and developers provides good opportunities for large-scale solutions for sustainable development. Thousands of decision makers and specialists visit Hammarby Sjöstad every year, making it one of Stockholm’s most important destinations. Total number of developers is 33 developers and 29 architectural firms in total. Financial Investment is public/private: € 0.5 billion public and € 3 billion from private sector.

Photo Gallery

Name of the photographer/photo credits: Lennart Johansson, Stockholm City Planning Department